Well, now DIREC’s over we’re starting to gear up to COP16 in Cancun and I’ve got some info on a conference taking place during the middle weekend, plus thinking ahead to 2011 with an event in Johannesburg.

How confident are you on our response to Climate Change?

As mentioned by my colleague in the last post, HSBC has recently published it’s annual Climate Confidence Monitor report for 2010 [PDF, 894kb]. 16% of respondents globally reported Climate Change as their highest concern, third behind global economic stability and terrorism (both 17%). Large variations exist from country to country, though, 57% of people in China strongly agreeing with the statement ‘Climate change and how we respond to it are mong the biggest issues I worry about today’, with the equivalent percentage 18 in the USA and just 16 in the UK.

When asked about the most important actions individuals could take on climate change, energy efficiency scored highly. 24% replied ‘reducing home heating or air conditioning’, and a further 23% ‘energy saving home improvements’.

The role of energy efficiency in our response to climate change will be one of topics under discussion at the World Climate Summit, timed to take place during, but not clashing with, COP16 (Sat & Sun 4-5 December, Cancun, Mexico). Other topics covered will include renewable energy and building the green economy. The management are unchaining me from my desk for COP16 and I’ll also be representing REEEP at this event, so I hope to see you there.

Capacity building the Carbon Markets in Africa

A recent survey of international finance and carbon professionals by Green Power Conferences to establish the factors which will have the greatest positive impact on the growth of the carbon market in Africa identified the most important factor as development of institutional capacity and skills. This is unlikely to come as a surprise as it has always been a significant obstacle to the development of the African carbon market.

The Results:

  • Improvement and development of institutional capacity and skills – 44.8%
  • Government-led regulatory reform and incentivisation schemes – 20.9%
  • Simplifying the CDM registration process – 19.4%
  • Identifying and leveraging a source of core finance for African projects – 14.9%

In an attempt to overcome this problem, the Carbon Markets & Climate Finance Africa Conference and Exhibition (Johannesburg, South Africa, 25-26 January 2011) will feature two pre-conference workshops on the means of building capacity and a keynote address from Dr. John Kilani, Director of Sustainable Development Mechanisms at the UNFCCC on the role of the carbon market in the development of African economies. Join the delegation at Carbon Markets & Climate Finance Africa to make your contribution to the debate, meet key investors and developers and help turn Africa into a major player in the global carbon markets.

More events soon!

James Smith, REEEP Community Facilitator

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